Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Wednesday's Hawkins Leadership Roundtable Agenda

Tomorrow’s Hawkins Leadership Roundtable activities will continue to connect participants with council members in ways that focus on developing participants’ leadership capabilities and elevating the work of their organizations.

The links for Tuesday’s slide presentation can be found here: http://bit.ly/1pEqErt

Wednesday’s lunch will begin at 11:30 am in room W209 A/B in the Orlando conference center. During this session the council will focus on the topic of “conversations with presidents or senior executives.” During this session, each council member will play the role of an institutional president and role-play with participants using questions commonly asked of CIOs by senior executives. The goal of this exercise is to discuss ways participants can better engage their institutions senior executives regarding IT issues.

During the evening the council will enjoy a reception starting at 6pm in the Orchid Room at the Hyatt Regency hotel. During the reception the council will enjoy remarks by EDUCAUSE president and CEO Diana Oblinger. Wednesday’s reception is designed to allow council participants and members to continue their conversations on critical issues faced by IT leaders.

Council participants and members are encouraged to continue with their one-on-one mentoring activities, ensuring that the mentoring experience begins at the EDUCAUSE conference and doesn’t stop once the conference ends.

About the Hawkins Leadership Roundtable: The Hawkins Leadership Roundtable is a leadership development program for new CIOs and individuals actively seeking a CIO role. The roundtable provides a 10-hour networking and mentoring experience integrated over three days of the EDUCAUSE Annual Conference. The program includes lunch sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday, an evening reception on Wednesday, and a hosted breakfast on Thursday with general session speaker Nancy Zimpher, as well as activities and information sharing before and after the conference week. For more information visit http://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/cio-and-executive-it-leader-experience/hawkins-leadership-roundtable on the Web.

Tuesday's Hawkins Leadership Roundtable Agenda

EDUCAUSE 2014 is here and the first meeting of the entire Hawkins Leadership Roundtable kicks off today at 12:30pm in room W209 A/B in the Orlando Conference center. Though this is the first time that the council will meet together as a group, participants should have already scheduled some time with their assigned Council members who will act as their mentors for the program. Many participants will have met with their mentor yesterday or today before the first lunch. As a council member myself I am meeting with my first protégé before Tuesday's lunch.

It’s up to the participants in the program to contact their assigned Council member for mentoring activities. This one-on-one collaboration is one of the most important benefits of the Hawkins Leadership Roundtable. Participants that have not yet contacted their assigned mentor should do so as soon as possible, for the conference will come and go in the blink of an eye.

Here’s what participants can look forward to during Tuesday’s lunch.
  • Remarks by Mike Duffield, General Manager for Education and Government at Workday, one of the sponsors for this year’s roundtable.
  • An icebreaker activity, facilitated by the Council members sitting with participants at their tables, where each will be asked to share three things about themself that is not commonly known by others. Participants should think about three things that they would like to share during this activity.
  • A brief conversation about IT leadership roles and their relationship to credibility. After a few opening remarks, the council will turn to table discussions facilitated by Council members directed at the following questions:
    1. What are the different roles that IT staff play across an institution? What knowledge, skills, and perspectives are critical for the IT organization’s ability to successfully perform these roles? How are IT leaders developing these competencies in their staff?
    2. What are the sources of credibility that support IT performance in multiple roles across an institution? What behaviors reinforce IT credibility and what behaviors detract from it? Are there any gaps in credibility that prevent participant's IT organizations from maximizing their potential impact on campus?
    3. How are participants positioned in regards to elevating the impact of their technology services in support of strategic initiatives at their institution? Are participant's organizations positioned to play more than a transactional service delivery role? What gaps in skills or credibility might be holding them back?
Participants should do some thinking about these questions and come prepared to discuss them during the lunch.

About the Hawkins Leadership Roundtable: The Hawkins Leadership Roundtable is a leadership development program for new CIOs and individuals actively seeking a CIO role. The roundtable provides a 10-hour networking and mentoring experience integrated over three days of the EDUCAUSE Annual Conference. The program includes lunch sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday, an evening reception on Wednesday, and a hosted breakfast on Thursday with general session speaker Nancy Zimpher, as well as activities and information sharing before and after the conference week. For more information visit http://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/cio-and-executive-it-leader-experience/hawkins-leadership-roundtable on the Web.

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Gratitude

[grat-i-tood, -tyood]
noun
  1. the quality or feeling of being grateful or thankful, as in "He expressed his gratitude to everyone who worked so hard."
Regardless of how many ERP implementations one has under one's belt, you’re never quite prepared for the stress and emotional roller coaster that ensues when you are racing towards go-lives, working through disagreements on how to reduce scope to make deadlines, validating conversion data that are not even close to being clean, preparing business offices across campus for the substantial changes they don’t see coming, and explaining to executives why these projects are so difficult, so expensive, and how all of that has very little to do with the technology itself.

But we did it.

I think the most amazing thing that has been accomplished at the University of Georgia through the ConnectUGA project has less to do with the new system and its capabilities but is really more about a group of people who came together and two years later accomplished things that most of them once thought were impossible. Together, we have experienced the hype cycle of ERP projects (peak of inflated expectations, trough of disillusionment, slope of enlightenment, plateau of productivity) and come out on the other side stronger than when we began.

There are lots of people to thank and it's time to get started.

To Nancy, congratulations on once again admitting the most academically qualified group of freshmen ever to enter the University of Georgia. You and David did a remarkable job, having this success for the first time using the new Athena system. Of course, you didn’t do it alone; you had Sarah, Tim, Stephen, Jason, Todd, Ramsey, Melissa, Patrick, Alan, Karen, Julie, Melanie, Kimberly, and Dee to help. A special thanks goes to Jason who did some miraculous work at the end in straightening out some very ugly transfer course data that did not come across cleanly.

To Fiona, you loaded and converted hundreds of programs and thousands of courses, and then you and your team worked round the clock to make sure everything was perfect for our students the first time they registered for courses. You also carried a huge load as the chair of our advisory team and we have all benefited from your wise counsel throughout the project. You had lots of help too, with Paree, Shefali, Amy, Brooke, Caleb, Mary, Melissa, Elizabeth, and Ron playing key roles. Others including Paula, Austin, Mary, Wendy, Melissa, Tracie, Jayne, and Bill were also key supporters.

To Bonnie, you successfully awarded hundreds of millions of dollars in financial aid to our students and your team’s eye for perfection made sure that our students could count on having this critical support available to them on a timely basis. You undertook significant new responsibilities as a result of some business process changes and you also delivered new modules for awarding our HOPE scholarship – one of the most critical resources we in the State of Georgia have for higher education. Lots of key players in your area provided their support, including Melanie, Donna, Gary, Nancy, Jay, and Mitzi. Additional help came from Joseph, Mandy, Elaina, Audrey, Kimberly, Michael Jason, Cheng-Yu, Pam, Jared, Joanne, Robert, Chris, Heather, and Dee.

To Jan, the heaviest part of our data conversion and validation burden fell to you and the burden was heavier than any of us ever anticipated. But you came through it and for the first time UGA was able to register over 35,000 students on the Web. This fall, we have one of the largest populations of students ever to enroll for courses and they all did so using new systems that you delivered. You had lots of help too, with Rosemary, Josie, Amy, Nikki, Donna, Julia, Melody, and Andrea consistently going above and beyond. Other support came from Tracie, Mary, Melissa, Kay, Claudia, Beau, Karen, Margaret, Julie, Melanie, and Teresa. A special thanks to Rosemary for stepping up and accepting greater responsibilities when the University required it and for carrying such a heavy load for so long.

To Lisa, your go-lives came at the end of the project and you made it look easy. Over the course of the past few weeks, the University has accepted millions of dollars in tuition and fee payments, all of them through the new modules that you delivered. Therese was your right hand person and you both had help from Melissa, Robby, Marcie, Shannon, and Nicole. Other key individuals working with you included Lena, Amy, Suzanne, Kristie, Jill, Deidra, Jennifer, Amber, Michelle, Julie, Shannon, Teresa, Kimberly, Jason, Dee, Carla, and Bill.

To my colleagues on the EITS student information systems support team, I owe you so much. Throughout this project, you all consistently worked above and beyond and I know that a 40 hour work week is a really foreign concept right now (which should begin to change soon). As we have worked over the past two years, the technology itself was never a problem and we have delivered these new systems with a flawless operational record. You all have my gratitude, including Larry, Mike, Ilir, Jenna, Connie, Aaron, Joel, Wanda, Todd, Gohreen, Angela, Mike, Renee, Andrew, Abby, Al, Angie, Seema, Imran, Yvonne, Lynn, and Margaret.

Others throughout EITS played critical supporting roles getting our network and server infrastructure ready for the implementation and supporting it day-to-day. This list is not exhaustive, but there are many who deserve a heartfelt thank-you, including Brian, Christian, Chris, Rayid, John, Andrew, Matt, John, and many others on the network team who made sure the entire network infrastructure worked. To Michael, Jeff, Stephanie, Chris, Stewart, Ryan, Chris, and John, who made our data center, storage, and server infrastructure hum. To Lynn, Kerri, and Tracy who made our communications strategy one of the best I’ve ever seen. To Shawn, Keith, Kristi, Basit, and others who made sure Athena worked well with our existing identity management systems. A big thanks also goes to Patrick and Stacey, who have led and organized meetings, kept the teams on track, and escalated issues as necessary – you’re the best project management team I’ve ever had.

To Chris, Holley, and Laura, thanks for being such strong partners and collaborators through both the good times and the challenging moments over the past three years. I think you may have thought I was a little off my rocker when I said we would experience a “trough of disillusionment” along our journey, but by now you certainly understand what I meant by that. Thanks for your wise counsel and for being willing to insist that I take some tough medicine when I needed it. You set the right tone and pace for all of our teams by being thoughtful, supportive leaders while also being willing to make the tougher decisions when necessary.

To Danna, a heartfelt thanks for stepping in at a critical time and helping us all see the larger forest for the trees, which helped us stay on track at some key moments in the project. I hated to lose you, but I can accept losing a great employee when they get the opportunity to move on to bigger and better things. You’ll make Stanford a better place over the next few years.

And finally, to Larry. You said 'yes' when I asked if you would relocate your family from Texas to Georgia and you stepped into a project with much tougher circumstances than you probably ever expected. But you have made the project a resounding success. Your dedication, hard work, long hours, and willingness to help anyone at any time about any challenge they have makes you one of the real gems at the University of Georgia. I owe you so much; a simple thank you doesn’t cover it. I’ll be in debt to you for a very, very long time.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Day Two Recap - Economic Development, the City of Atlanta, and Global Connections

Here’s a recap of day two on the University of Georgia (UGA) New Faculty Tour. The day began by driving south to Cartersville and from there the rest of the day was spent in and around the City of Atlanta.
  • In Cartersville the group toured the carpet manufacturing plant operated by Shaw Industries. Throughout Georgia the company employs over 15,000 individuals and the starting wage at its Cartersville plant is $15/hour. Shaw believes strongly in sustainability and currently recycles 95% of its waste. It’s aims to improve that to 100% by 2030.
  • Next stop was the Georgia State Capital building to hear comments from Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp and Senate Majority Caucus Chair Butch Miller. Miller stressed to the faculty the importance of compromise, something that is highly valued in Georgia politics, and lamented that too many of our social and economic ills result from inability to reach compromise.
  • Lunch was with Commissioner Gretchen Corbin of the Georgia Department of Community Affairs, USG chancellor Hank Huckaby, and UGA president Jere Morehead. Each spoke to the group and stressed the importance of higher education to the economic development of the state and the need for USG institutions to take a leadership role in strengthening this alignment.
  • After touring the Martin Luther King Center in Atlanta the group visited the UGA Alumni Center and the Terry College of Business facility in Buckhead. Following the tour, the group took a break before enjoying dinner with the Consular Corp of Atlanta, UGA provost Pamela Whitten, and UGA Alumni Association president Tim Keadle. Canadian Consul General Stephen Brereton stressed the importance of global collaboration and the special relationship that UGA enjoys with countries across the world.
After dinner the group returned to its hotel for an evenings rest. All enjoyed a great day. Wednesday’s program includes stops at Senoia for a tour of Riverwood Studios and stops at the Kia Motors facility in West Point and at Robins Air Force Base. More to come.